Paris Fashion Week 2017

By Caroline Potts


A Brief History of the Fashion Show

         The idea of the fashion show came to existence in France in 1858 at a Parisian fashion house, otherwise known as the House of Worth. Charles Frederick Worth presented a “parade,” or défilé, of models wearing his designs to his wealthiest clients, inventing the idea of both the fashion show and the live model. The first official American fashion show occurred in 1903 in a New York City shop called Ehrich Brothers. In 1943, during the German occupation of France, Eleanor Lambert of New York City organized the fashion shows of numerous designers under a single period of time, calling the shows “Press Week.” In 1945, the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture established a time during which each designer exhibited a minimum of 35 looks, establishing a time of “haute couture,” or “high fashion.” In 1958, the National Chamber for Italian Fashion established “Settimana Della Moda” in Milan; however, many individual designers such as Dolce & Gabbana exhibited and continue to exhibit their models without the interference of the National Chamber for Italian Fashion. In 1973, the French Fashion Federation organized “Paris Fashion Week,” presenting many “prêt-à-porter,” or “ready-to-wear,”  designs at the Versailles Palace. In 1984, the British Fashion Council founded “London Fashion Week.” The shows in New York City were simply called “7th on Sixth,” in honor of the Council of Fashion Designers of America, until 2004 when Olympus, a camera company, renamed the series of shows “Olympus Fashion Week.”

A Look into the Prêt-à-Porter Paris Fashion Week of 2017

In the Prêt-à-Porter Paris Fashion Week from September 25 to October 3, designers presented the spring and summer looks of 2018 to crowds in numerous locations across Paris. Below are numerous designs exhibited at the show.

Jacquemus by Simon Porte Jacquemus
Jacquemus by Simon Porte Jacquemus presented “happy, excited, and impatient” looks reflecting his fun childhood to open Paris Fashion Week on the night of September 25.
Christian Dior by Maria Grazia Chiuri
The models of Christian Dior by Maria Grazia Chiuri exhibited comfortable designs, with visible underwear and low heels, in hopes of appealing to millennials and honoring female artists.
Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello
Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello presented models covered in feathers, glitter, and satin in front of the glimmering Eiffel Tower on the night of September 26 in efforts to capturing the idea of fun “escape” from the business of life.
Lacoste by Felipe Oliveira Baptista
Lacoste by Felipe Oliveira Baptista presented looks of the “past, present, [and] future” on a runway modeled after a basketball court, closing the show with pastel polo dresses.
Chloé by Natacha Ramsay-Levi
Chloé by Natacha Ramsay-Levi showed models in printed boots accessorized with multi-strap anti-It bags in a successful show, which culminated looks of the predecessors of Ramsay-Levi.
Balmain by Olivier Rousteing
Balmain by Olivier Rousteing exhibited designs with sharp V necklines and hints of gold at the Palais Garnier, an opera house where Rousteing was taken as a child by his adopted parents, with hopes of impressing audiences.

 

Elie Saab by Elie Saab
Elie Saab by Elie Saab exhibited models dressed in the colors Amazon theme with hints of camouflage and green and accessorized with fall hats on the afternoon of September 30.
Givenchy by Clare Waight Keller
Givenchy by Clare Waight Keller showcased models at the Palais de Justice, a government building, emphasizing the shoulder, the classic clover print of 1961, and the classic animal motifs of 1981; utilizing black and white shades with mint and red accents; and introducing the GV3, a multi-strap handbag.
Balenciaga by Demna Gvasalia
Balenciaga by Demna Gvasalia presented a gothic collection with spiked, pointed heels, croc platforms, and lingerie attached to other garments.
Valentino by Pierpaolo Piccioli
Valentino by Pierpaolo Piccioli encompassed the beauty of Earth during the Apollo Moon Landing through clear plastic and embellished athletic gear during the afternoon of October 1.
Hermès by Nadège Vanhee-Cybulski
Hermès by Nadège Vanhee-Cybulski presented models in checkered patterns in a room covered in graph paper.
Chanel by Karl Lagerfeld
Chanel by Karl Lagerfeld beautifully exhibited models in clear plastic, pastels, and fringe in what seemed to be somewhat of a disco themed collection against the waterfalls of the Gorges du Verdon, where a rainbow happened to grace the runway.
Louis Vuitton by Nicolas Ghesquière
Louis Vuitton by Nicolas Ghesquière presented models clothed in frock coats and silk running shorts at a new pavilion at the Louvre, in what was a moat that protected a castle, in attempt to create anachronism, the idea of portraying costume through everyday wear; the show included a Stranger Things shirt and the presentation of a new sneaker.

 

References:

http://fashionweekonline.com/history-of-fashion-week

http://www.marieclaire.com/fashion/a10274/history-of-fashion-week/

https://fhcm.paris/en/paris-fashion-week-en/fashionshows-schedule/?session=session_1496153174

https://www.vogue.com/fashion-shows/spring-2018-ready-to-wear

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